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Veelgestelde vragen

  •  

    I have some free time in Kathmandu?

    My personal favourite is the Pashupatinath temple, to the north east of Kathmandu city centre. You know those photos you’ve seen of the sadhus or holy men, with the long dreadlocks and ash covered bodies? Well this is where most of them hang out!Regarded as one of the holiest temples of Lord Shiva, it’s so old that nobody is certain when it was founded. Like Varanasi in India, cremation pyres line the banks of the Bagmati river and it’s one of the most fascinating places in the Kathmandu valley to people watch. Joanna Zubr - Customer Operations

  •  

    Is travelling in Tibet difficult?

    Things have improved in recent years but you should be aware that a lot of the roads are still very bumpy and dusty, the altitude can have an effect and some of the facilities are not what you may get elsewhere! You need to travel with an open mind and remember that Tibet has been traditionally quite poor and facilities, especially in some hotels, may not always be up to a western standard, although we will always do our best to ensure clients are as comfortable as possible. There are some fairly long days of driving on this trip, and due to the rough roads and altitude this can be tiring. The road resurfacing can result in some delays and the border formalities can take time and it is not unusual to have to queue for around an hour or more at passport control. The road after the border to Kathmandu is not in a very good condition and we will be in a bus for this part of the journey. Whilst in Tibet you will spend most of the time above 3500m and altitude must be taken into consideration, but plenty of time is given for acclimatisation. This is quite a tough trip, due to the high altitudes and bad roads, but the stunning scenery, cultural interest and the Tibetan people make any discomforts worthwhile. Joanna Zubr - Tibet Operations

  •  

    Cycling Tibet articles

    Andrew Coker, one of our clients, travelled on this trip and you can read his article to get a personal viewpoint of the holiday.

  •  

    How experienced do I have to be for the Lhasa to Kathmandu bike ride?

    Whilst you could join this trip with limited experience as a cyclist, due to the higher altitudes and longer days of this trip, we would recommend this trip for cyclists who ride regularly and who have perhaps already undertaken some of our other cycling trips.  Your body will soon get used to consecutive days in the saddle, but if you arrive with a higher level of experience, skill and bike-fitness, you will be able to focus more on taking in the amazing sights & sounds of this beautiful country and not worry so much about having tired legs or getting saddle sore!  This trip is vehicle supported for the vast majority of the route, so you can chose to ride as much or as little as you like, but we think you will get more out of the trip if you arrive as well prepared as possible. Olly Townsend - Operational Quality

  •  

    What weather should I expect in Tibet?

    As nearly all of Tibet lies above 3,500m it has a harsh climate. At the times of year when we visit Tibet (March to October) the weather is generally dry and clear, with brilliant blue skies and daytime temperatures of 10ºC to 25ºC in Lhasa. The days should be pleasantly warm (provided there is sunshine) for most of the trip, although on the trips in October will be much cooler. On the road journeys the tops of the high passes can be cold and windy and it is advisable to keep a warm jacket with you on the bus. As soon as the sun goes down the temperature falls rapidly. The nights will be cooler and will be very cold in Rongbuk in September and October with temperatures well below freezing. Some of the hotels we use can be cold at nights in September and October. There can be wind and dust storms in the afternoons especially at Rongbuk. From June to September it is monsoon season in Nepal and it will be hot and humid in Nepal and you may well get rain. Joanna Zubr - Tibet Operations

  •  

    Any good restuarant tips in Lhasa?

    Situated near the entrance of Yak Hotel and close to Barkhor Street, Dunya restaurant offers everything from pizza, pasta to Indian /Nepalese dishes (you can even try yak steak!!) giving a welcome break from the monotonous Chinese food and packed lunches that you have had or are likely to have once you get out of Lhasa. All staff working here speak good English and is a popular eat out/meeting place amongst the expats and western guides and leaders while in Lhasa. Check out the well stocked bar upstairs and have a chat with Fred (if he is around) with his wonderful stories of life in Tibet he loves to share with travelers. Niraj Chand Shrestha - Customer Operations

  •  

    Considering the political situation, should I travel to Tibet?

    The Dalai Lama has stated that he believes westerners should visit Tibet so that Tibet and the Tibetans do not become isolated, and our belief is that the Tibetans themselves, in general, regard the presence of westerners in Tibet as a positive factor. Our agent in Tibet is Tibetan and as far as possible, we only use Tibetan guides and drivers or Chinese guides sympathetic to Tibetan culture. Wherever possible we use facilities that are Tibetan owned and run. Sometimes this is not possible and travelling in Tibet you must understand this. Brendan Phelan - Customer Operations

  •  

    Nepal country guide (including plugs!)

    Please visit the Exodus Travel Guide to Nepal where you can find out what plugs they use, as well as more detailed Country information in the menu on the left of the page.

  •  

    Exodus staff - expertise on hand to help

    All the staff at Exodus share a passion for adventure travel, and are always happy to answer any questions you may have. You can find an expert for the area you are interested in here and can contact them to get further information. If you don't see your specific country listed, please email customerops@exodus.co.uk and they will get the answers you need!

  •  

    I have some free time in Kathmandu?

    My personal favourite is the Pashupatinath temple, to the north east of Kathmandu city centre. You know those photos you’ve seen of the sadhus or holy men, with the long dreadlocks and ash covered bodies? Well this is where most of them hang out!Regarded as one of the holiest temples of Lord Shiva, it’s so old that nobody is certain when it was founded. Like Varanasi in India, cremation pyres line the banks of the Bagmati river and it’s one of the most fascinating places in the Kathmandu valley to people watch. Joanna Zubr - Customer Operations

  •  

    Is travelling in Tibet difficult?

    Things have improved in recent years but you should be aware that a lot of the roads are still very bumpy and dusty, the altitude can have an effect and some of the facilities are not what you may get elsewhere! You need to travel with an open mind and remember that Tibet has been traditionally quite poor and facilities, especially in some hotels, may not always be up to a western standard, although we will always do our best to ensure clients are as comfortable as possible. There are some fairly long days of driving on this trip, and due to the rough roads and altitude this can be tiring. The road resurfacing can result in some delays and the border formalities can take time and it is not unusual to have to queue for around an hour or more at passport control. The road after the border to Kathmandu is not in a very good condition and we will be in a bus for this part of the journey. Whilst in Tibet you will spend most of the time above 3500m and altitude must be taken into consideration, but plenty of time is given for acclimatisation. This is quite a tough trip, due to the high altitudes and bad roads, but the stunning scenery, cultural interest and the Tibetan people make any discomforts worthwhile. Joanna Zubr - Tibet Operations

  •  

    Cycling Tibet articles

    Andrew Coker, one of our clients, travelled on this trip and you can read his article to get a personal viewpoint of the holiday.

  •  

    How experienced do I have to be for the Lhasa to Kathmandu bike ride?

    Whilst you could join this trip with limited experience as a cyclist, due to the higher altitudes and longer days of this trip, we would recommend this trip for cyclists who ride regularly and who have perhaps already undertaken some of our other cycling trips.  Your body will soon get used to consecutive days in the saddle, but if you arrive with a higher level of experience, skill and bike-fitness, you will be able to focus more on taking in the amazing sights & sounds of this beautiful country and not worry so much about having tired legs or getting saddle sore!  This trip is vehicle supported for the vast majority of the route, so you can chose to ride as much or as little as you like, but we think you will get more out of the trip if you arrive as well prepared as possible. Olly Townsend - Operational Quality

  •  

    What weather should I expect in Tibet?

    As nearly all of Tibet lies above 3,500m it has a harsh climate. At the times of year when we visit Tibet (March to October) the weather is generally dry and clear, with brilliant blue skies and daytime temperatures of 10ºC to 25ºC in Lhasa. The days should be pleasantly warm (provided there is sunshine) for most of the trip, although on the trips in October will be much cooler. On the road journeys the tops of the high passes can be cold and windy and it is advisable to keep a warm jacket with you on the bus. As soon as the sun goes down the temperature falls rapidly. The nights will be cooler and will be very cold in Rongbuk in September and October with temperatures well below freezing. Some of the hotels we use can be cold at nights in September and October. There can be wind and dust storms in the afternoons especially at Rongbuk. From June to September it is monsoon season in Nepal and it will be hot and humid in Nepal and you may well get rain. Joanna Zubr - Tibet Operations

  •  

    Any good restuarant tips in Lhasa?

    Situated near the entrance of Yak Hotel and close to Barkhor Street, Dunya restaurant offers everything from pizza, pasta to Indian /Nepalese dishes (you can even try yak steak!!) giving a welcome break from the monotonous Chinese food and packed lunches that you have had or are likely to have once you get out of Lhasa. All staff working here speak good English and is a popular eat out/meeting place amongst the expats and western guides and leaders while in Lhasa. Check out the well stocked bar upstairs and have a chat with Fred (if he is around) with his wonderful stories of life in Tibet he loves to share with travelers. Niraj Chand Shrestha - Customer Operations

  •  

    Considering the political situation, should I travel to Tibet?

    The Dalai Lama has stated that he believes westerners should visit Tibet so that Tibet and the Tibetans do not become isolated, and our belief is that the Tibetans themselves, in general, regard the presence of westerners in Tibet as a positive factor. Our agent in Tibet is Tibetan and as far as possible, we only use Tibetan guides and drivers or Chinese guides sympathetic to Tibetan culture. Wherever possible we use facilities that are Tibetan owned and run. Sometimes this is not possible and travelling in Tibet you must understand this. Brendan Phelan - Customer Operations

  •  

    Nepal country guide (including plugs!)

    Please visit the Exodus Travel Guide to Nepal where you can find out what plugs they use, as well as more detailed Country information in the menu on the left of the page.

  •  

    Exodus staff - expertise on hand to help

    All the staff at Exodus share a passion for adventure travel, and are always happy to answer any questions you may have. You can find an expert for the area you are interested in here and can contact them to get further information. If you don't see your specific country listed, please email customerops@exodus.co.uk and they will get the answers you need!

  •  

    How do I join the Departure Lounge (forum) in the Exodus Community?

    To view the Forums, including the Departure Lounge, you do not need to be member of the Exodus Community, simply click on the Community link at the top of every page and read the posts in their respective sections by entering the Departure Lounge, or one of the other options in the list on the page. To join in a discussion, if already a member, please sign in to your Exodus website account (not related to booking reservations) to contribute to the Forum. If you are not a member of the Exodus Community, you can register by clicking the 'Sign in' at the top of every webpage and select ‘Register’ within the drop down panel. When viewing the Forum area of the website, as you scroll through the 'Rooms' which are set out by 'travel months' during the current year within the Departure Lounge. You can then select the 'month' of intended travel, then filter the list of trips that have already been created by fellow travellers to see if your trip is listed. If the trip you are travelling on is not in the list, you can start the process by clicking on the 'Post new forum topic' link above the list on the same page. If you do see your trip within the list, select it to view the 'discussion' by your fellow travellers and you can join in by completing the 'Post your comment' section below the discussion thread. Please note: there will be a delay before your post/comment appears as intended because we moderate what is published on the website. We hope you enjoy using the Departure Lounge to meet your fellow travellers and continue to contribute right up to the start of your journey with Exodus.

  •  

    How do I join the Departure Lounge (forum) in the Exodus Community?

    To view the Forums, including the Departure Lounge, you do not need to be member of the Exodus Community, simply click on the Community link at the top of every page and read the posts in their respective sections by entering the Departure Lounge, or one of the other options in the list on the page. To join in a discussion, if already a member, please sign in to your Exodus website account (not related to booking reservations) to contribute to the Forum. If you are not a member of the Exodus Community, you can register by clicking the 'Sign in' at the top of every webpage and select ‘Register’ within the drop down panel. When viewing the Forum area of the website, as you scroll through the 'Rooms' which are set out by 'travel months' during the current year within the Departure Lounge. You can then select the 'month' of intended travel, then filter the list of trips that have already been created by fellow travellers to see if your trip is listed. If the trip you are travelling on is not in the list, you can start the process by clicking on the 'Post new forum topic' link above the list on the same page. If you do see your trip within the list, select it to view the 'discussion' by your fellow travellers and you can join in by completing the 'Post your comment' section below the discussion thread. Please note: there might be slight a delay before your post/comment appears as intended because we moderate what is published on the website. We hope you enjoy using the Departure Lounge to meet your fellow travellers and continue to contribute right up to the start of your journey with Exodus.

  •  

    I have some free time in Kathmandu?

    My personal favourite is the Pashupatinath temple, to the north east of Kathmandu city centre. You know those photos you’ve seen of the sadhus or holy men, with the long dreadlocks and ash covered bodies? Well this is where most of them hang out!

    Regarded as one of the holiest temples of Lord Shiva, it’s so old that nobody is certain when it was founded. Like Varanasi in India, cremation pyres line the banks of the Bagmati river and it’s one of the most fascinating places in the Kathmandu valley to people watch.

    Joanna Zubr - Customer Operations

  •  

    Is travelling in Tibet difficult?

    Things have improved in recent years but you should be aware that a lot of the roads are still very bumpy and dusty, the altitude can have an effect and some of the facilities are not what you may get elsewhere! You need to travel with an open mind and remember that Tibet has been traditionally quite poor and facilities, especially in some hotels, may not always be up to a western standard, although we will always do our best to ensure clients are as comfortable as possible.

    There are some fairly long days of driving on this trip, and due to the rough roads and altitude this can be tiring. The road resurfacing can result in some delays and the border formalities can take time and it is not unusual to have to queue for around an hour or more at passport control. The road after the border to Kathmandu is not in a very good condition and we will be in a bus for this part of the journey. Whilst in Tibet you will spend most of the time above 3500m and altitude must be taken into consideration, but plenty of time is given for acclimatisation. This is quite a tough trip, due to the high altitudes and bad roads, but the stunning scenery, cultural interest and the Tibetan people make any discomforts worthwhile.

    Joanna Zubr - Tibet Operations

  •  

    Cycling Tibet articles

    Andrew Coker, one of our clients, travelled on this trip and you can read his article to get a personal viewpoint of the holiday.

  •  

    How experienced do I have to be for the Lhasa to Kathmandu bike ride?

    Whilst you could join this trip with limited experience as a cyclist, due to the higher altitudes and longer days of this trip, we would recommend this trip for cyclists who ride regularly and who have perhaps already undertaken some of our other cycling trips.  Your body will soon get used to consecutive days in the saddle, but if you arrive with a higher level of experience, skill and bike-fitness, you will be able to focus more on taking in the amazing sights & sounds of this beautiful country and not worry so much about having tired legs or getting saddle sore!  This trip is vehicle supported for the vast majority of the route, so you can chose to ride as much or as little as you like, but we think you will get more out of the trip if you arrive as well prepared as possible.

    Olly Townsend - Operational Quality

  •  

    What weather should I expect in Tibet?

    As nearly all of Tibet lies above 3,500m it has a harsh climate. At the times of year when we visit Tibet (March to October) the weather is generally dry and clear, with brilliant blue skies and daytime temperatures of 10ºC to 25ºC in Lhasa. The days should be pleasantly warm (provided there is sunshine) for most of the trip, although on the trips in October will be much cooler. On the road journeys the tops of the high passes can be cold and windy and it is advisable to keep a warm jacket with you on the bus. As soon as the sun goes down the temperature falls rapidly. The nights will be cooler and will be very cold in Rongbuk in September and October with temperatures well below freezing. Some of the hotels we use can be cold at nights in September and October. There can be wind and dust storms in the afternoons especially at Rongbuk. From June to September it is monsoon season in Nepal and it will be hot and humid in Nepal and you may well get rain.

    Joanna Zubr - Tibet Operations

  •  

    Any good restuarant tips in Lhasa?

    Situated near the entrance of Yak Hotel and close to Barkhor Street, Dunya restaurant offers everything from pizza, pasta to Indian /Nepalese dishes (you can even try yak steak!!) giving a welcome break from the monotonous Chinese food and packed lunches that you have had or are likely to have once you get out of Lhasa. All staff working here speak good English and is a popular eat out/meeting place amongst the expats and western guides and leaders while in Lhasa. Check out the well stocked bar upstairs and have a chat with Fred (if he is around) with his wonderful stories of life in Tibet he loves to share with travelers.

    Niraj Chand Shrestha - Customer Operations

  •  

    Considering the political situation, should I travel to Tibet?

    The Dalai Lama has stated that he believes westerners should visit Tibet so that Tibet and the Tibetans do not become isolated, and our belief is that the Tibetans themselves, in general, regard the presence of westerners in Tibet as a positive factor. Our agent in Tibet is Tibetan and as far as possible, we only use Tibetan guides and drivers or Chinese guides sympathetic to Tibetan culture. Wherever possible we use facilities that are Tibetan owned and run. Sometimes this is not possible and travelling in Tibet you must understand this.

    Brendan Phelan - Customer Operations

  •  

    Exodus staff - expertise on hand to help

    All the staff at Exodus share a passion for adventure travel, and are always happy to answer any questions you may have. You can find an expert for the area you are interested in here and can contact them to get further information. If you don't see your specific country listed, please email customerops@exodus.co.uk and they will get the answers you need!

  •  

    How do I join the Departure Lounge (forum) in the Exodus Community?

    To view the Forums, including the Departure Lounge, you do not need to be member of the Exodus Community, simply click on the Community link at the top of every page and read the posts in their respective sections by entering the Departure Lounge, or one of the other options in the list on the page.

    To join in a discussion, if already a member, please sign in to your Exodus website account (not related to booking reservations) to contribute to the Forum. If you are not a member of the Exodus Community, you can register by clicking the 'Sign in' at the top of every webpage and select ‘Register’ within the drop down panel.

    When viewing the Forum area of the website, as you scroll through the 'Rooms' which are set out by 'travel months' during the current year within the Departure Lounge. You can then select the 'month' of intended travel, then filter the list of trips that have already been created by fellow travellers to see if your trip is listed. If the trip you are travelling on is not in the list, you can start the process by clicking on the 'Post new forum topic' link above the list on the same page. If you do see your trip within the list, select it to view the 'discussion' by your fellow travellers and you can join in by completing the 'Post your comment' section below the discussion thread.

    Please note: there might be slight a delay before your post/comment appears as intended because we moderate what is published on the website.

    We hope you enjoy using the Departure Lounge to meet your fellow travellers and continue to contribute right up to the start of your journey with Exodus.

  •  

    Do I have to bring my own bike?

    No, a quality local hire bike is included in the overall price of this cycling holiday.
    If you prefer the familiarity of your own bike, you may of course bring it along. A discount of GBP150 will apply if you do so.

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