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Beoordelingen van onze reizigers

Reisbegeleiding 9,0
Vervoer 7,9
Overnachtingen 8,2
Reisroute 8,4
9.8 16 beoordelingen
  • 10

    Great hike and safari

    What was the most inspirational moment of your trip?

    What did you think of your group leader?

    Do you have any advice for potential travellers?

    Is there anything else you would like to add?

  • 10

    Kilimanjaro Lemosho Route and Safari

    Great trek to the 'Roof of Africa' followed by a enthralling safari taking in the Ngorongoro Crater, Olduvai Gorge and the Serengeti.

    What was the most inspirational moment of your trip?

    Standing on the summit of Kilimanjaro was amazing and Summit day was the hardest piece of trekking I have ever done - quite literally breaktaking! But there were great views and experiences along the way too - a stunning view from Shira Cathedral of Kilimanjaro, Mt Meru and the Shira plateau and I loved climbing the Barranco Wall and then discovering an absolutely delightful valley a little later the same day - it was my favourite day of trekking - I loved it! The view of the Ngorongoro crater from the view point on the crater's edge was astounding and the Olduvai Gorge - the cradle of mankind - was incredible. And on Safari the sights and sounds both day and night were magical at times. We saw so many different animals and birds that I lost count.

    What did you think of your group leader?

    Meke our group leader was fantastic. So cheerful and encouraging and showing real concern for all of us. I would not have made it to the summit without him and the other guides in our group (Wilfried and Said), they were great.

    Do you have any advice for potential travellers?

    Some physical preparation before the trip will pay off and make the whole trek more enjoyable. Listen to your guides - they are experts and know what they are talking about. You don't need to change your currency to Shillings, US dollars are accepted everywhere that you go on this trip, just make sure they are newish. The drive across the Serengeti was very, very bumpy - just be prepared for it, after all it is a Safari in Africa. Be prepared to come home dirty and dusty but very happy!

    Is there anything else you would like to add?

    I have just had the time of my life! Everything was well organised, trouble free and I always felt safe and looked after - without being molly-coddled. I can't wait to do another trip and would definitely book with Exodus again.

  • 10

    Great hike and safari

    Ascent of Kilimanjaro along the Lemosho route, followed by safari through Ngorongoro Conservation Area, Oldupai Gorge and Serengeti. The ascent, run by the African Walking Company, was extremely well run. The guides and porters could not do enough to provide first rate support for the group and made sure everyone was catered for, even if it meant splitting the group up into differing abilities. Im quite a large guy, and felt a little uneasy on some of the slopes which we had to scramble up, but the guides patiently helped me up and never rushed me. There was rarely any shortage of food or drink, and everything was provided when required. Everyone in our group summitted and team spirits remained high throughout. The follow up safari, run by Karibu safaris, provided a relaxing wind down to the ascent. Despite this, we were left feeling it was arranged as an after thought rather than principal part of the trip.

    What was the most inspirational moment of your trip?

    Summiting Uhuru peak, and watching the sunrise over Mawenzi peak at 5600m below Stella Point.

    What did you think of your group leader?

    The climb group leader Meke was first rate, his experience of climbing the mountain was second to none and his team of guides were equally top notch. They all made us feel like they had our very best interests at heart and went that extra mile to make sure we all succeeded.

    Do you have any advice for potential travellers?

    Ascent - Bring at least one lock per kitbag, while the guides and porters within our group were trustworthy, they advised extra vigilance when stopping in campsites - Follow the advice of the guides on the mountain. - Pack economically, but effectively. Don't overpack your day pack as you'll run the risk of exhaustion on the lower slopes, which will impact your performance higher up. - Get as much sleep as you can, when ascending, and save the partying for when you come back down. - Eat and drink as much as possible, and as often as possible. As you get higher up the mountain, you will need as much energy as you can get. I frequently polished off all of the meals put in front of me, and summitted without the need for any diamox and without any headaches. - When renting kit, make sure it is the correct size before reaching the mountain. I rented a sleeping bag which turned out to be too small. Despite the best efforts of the guides to replace it once on the mountain, they didnt have any suitable replacement. Ultimately, I needed to wear extra layers in bed, to keep warm, though by summit night, I was well aware of the best combination of layers for keeping warm in the night air. - Do rent a sleeping mat though, as its not included in your 15kg bag limit, and generally much better for sleeping on the mountain than a thermarest - Trim your toenails extra short for summit night... the descent from Kibo involves skiing down scree, for an extended period. Even after two weeks, my toes are still sore from the experience. - A lightweight but rigid, waterproof sleeve/envelope would be useful for carrying your summit certificate in to ensure it doesnt get damaged during the safari Safari - A good pair of binoculars will pay dividends If transiting Addis Ababa, try some of the local dishes at the airport.

    Is there anything else you would like to add?

    Special mention for Emmanuel, our driver from the African Walking Company, who drove us to the mountain, picked us up afterwards, and also met us after the safari to transfer us to our flight home. Like everyone else in the African Walking Company, he was always cheerful and helpful, and couldnt do enough to help us out. The organisation of the safari was less satisfactory as we didn't receive any update when returning from the mountain as to how, or at what time, we would meet our guide. Despite asking at reception for an approximate time, we found that our guide arrived half an hour earlier than anticipated, meaning our departure was somewhat hurried. Unlike on the ascent, no additional information was provided as to where we were going or what we could expect. While the guide was perfectly competent at finding lots of animals, we seemed to simply drive from place to place randomly. We were provided basic printed maps of Kili for the climb, however I feel similar maps of Ngorongoro and the Serengeti would have framed this part of the trip better. There were information centres at Ngorongoro and the Serengeti which could also have provided this additional information, but these weren't pointed out when we arrived. That aside, Id still highly recommend this overall trip.

  • 10

    Great hike and safari

    Ascent of Kilimanjaro along the Lemosho route, followed by safari through Ngorongoro Conservation Area, Oldupai Gorge and Serengeti. The ascent, run by the African Walking Company, was extremely well run. The guides and porters could not do enough to provide first rate support for the group and made sure everyone was catered for, even if it meant splitting the group up into differing abilities. Im quite a large guy, and felt a little uneasy on some of the slopes which we had to scramble up, but the guides patiently helped me up and never rushed me. There was rarely any shortage of food or drink, and everything was provided when required. Everyone in our group summitted and team spirits remained high throughout. The follow up safari, run by Karibu safaris, provided a relaxing wind down to the ascent. Despite this, we were left feeling it was arranged as an after thought rather than principal part of the trip.

    What was the most inspirational moment of your trip?

    Summiting Uhuru peak, and watching sunrise over Mawenzi peak, below Stella Point.

    What did you think of your group leader?

    The climb group leader Meke was first rate, his experience of climbing the mountain was second to none and his team of guides were equally top notch. They all made us feel like they had our very best interests at heart and went that extra mile to make sure we all succeeded.

    Do you have any advice for potential travellers?

    Ascent - Bring at least one lock per kitbag, while the guides and porters within our group were trustworthy, they advised extra vigilance when stopping in campsites - Follow the advice of the guides on the mountain. - Pack economically, but effectively. Don't overpack your day pack as you'll run the risk of exhaustion on the lower slopes, which will impact your performance higher up. - Get as much sleep as you can, when ascending, and save the partying for when you come back down. - Eat and drink as much as possible, and as often as possible. As you get higher up the mountain, you will need as much energy as you can get. I frequently polished off all of the meals put in front of me, and summitted without the need for any diamox and without any headaches. - When renting kit, make sure it is the correct size before reaching the mountain. I rented a sleeping bag which turned out to be too small. Despite the best efforts of the guides to replace it once on the mountain, they didnt have any suitable replacement. Ultimately, I needed to wear extra layers in bed, to keep warm, though by summit night, I was well aware of the best combination of layers for keeping warm in the night air. - Do rent a sleeping mat though, as its not included in your 15kg bag limit, and generally much better for sleeping on the mountain than a thermarest - Trim your toenails extra short for summit night... the descent from Kibo involves skiing down scree, for an extended period. Even after two weeks, my toes are still sore from the experience. - A lightweight but rigid, waterproof sleeve/envelope would be useful for carrying your summit certificate in to ensure it doesnt get damaged during the safari Safari - A good pair of binoculars will pay dividends If transiting Addis Ababa, try some of the local dishes at the airport.

    Is there anything else you would like to add?

    Special mention for Emmanuel, our driver from the African Walking Company, who drove us to the mountain, picked us up afterwards, and also met us after the safari to transfer us to our flight home. Like everyone else in the African Walking Company, he was always cheerful and helpful, and couldnt do enough to help us out. The organisation of the safari was less satisfactory as we didn't receive any update when returning from the mountain as to how, or at what time, we would meet our guide. Despite asking at reception for an approximate time, we found that our guide arrived half an hour earlier than anticipated, meaning our departure was somewhat hurried. Unlike on the ascent, no additional information was provided as to where we were going or what we could expect. While the guide was perfectly competent at finding lots of animals, we seemed to simply drive from place to place randomly. We were provided basic printed maps of Kili for the climb, however I feel similar maps of Ngorongoro and the Serengeti would have framed this part of the trip better. There were information centres at Ngorongoro and the Serengeti which could also have provided this additional information, but these weren't pointed out when we arrived. That aside, Id still highly recommend this overall trip.

  • 10

    Review of Kilimanjaro Lemosho Route and Safari

    Arrangements prior to our travel were very good indeed with Kate at Exodus exploring lots of options for our rather complicated itinerary from Aberdeen and Rwanda to the start of our trip at Arusha. Our chief guide, Makeke, was very welcoming and highly professional throughout but wasn't terribly aware that payment for our transfers had been made or of the arrangements at the end of the safari for transfer back to Kilimanjaro airport for our flights home. In the end, we had to pay for a room in which to shower at Kia Lodge and for the transfer to the airport. This part of the plan was not made clear to us at all beforehand and seemed rather ad hoc on the day.. However, once, the trek began, we quickly fell into camp routine and gelled as a team. This was greatly aided by the good nature and positive approach of the assistant guides and porters. Even when the inevitable effects of altitude took their toll of us on different days, the guides encouraged us and we regained our self-belief. Catering throughout was extraordinary given the camp conditions and the need for every item to be carried, unpacked and packed again every day. There was never a shortage of tasty food. All of us were well fed and only suffered from the predictable loss of appetite once or twice. Porters were outstanding. The two girls who carried our gear welcomed us into camp each afternoon with congratulations and smiles even although they had carried more than twice our loads at high speed past us. We certainly take our hats of to them all. The summit day was one of the most challenging of our mountaineering experience. Don't be lulled into false expectations because of the term, trek. It was a very serious and demanding mountain experience that took everyone to their limit. The cold, the driving icy wind and the altitude conspired to make us feel absolutely miserable. However, the guides maintained the necessary "pole pole" pace for us to maintain confidence that we could reach the summit. Ten out of twelve of us succeeded in this. The determination in some team colleagues was inspiring. Disappointingly, we had little opportunity to take photographs as the guides seemed to be working to a tight schedule for descent. Frustration about opportunities to stop for photos and drinking had surfaced earlier when, despite constant advice to drink from the guides, we were given little opportunity to do so while walking. The descent back to Barafu Camp was as grueling in some ways as the ascent with the further challenge of another descent to Millennium Camp. The next and last day also involved a massive descent back into the heat of the rain forest that was the final test of endurance. We were very glad to have succeeded in the climb but gladder that it was over. The stage of the trip that we had rather neglected in our thinking was the safari with the focus being on Kilimanjaro but it proved to be an absolute highlight. The landscapes, the density, variety and proximity of the wonderful animals and the quiet expertise of our safari guide were all utterly memorable. We would advise anyone to add on this element if they can. It was exciting, awe-inspiring and relaxing with perfectly tuned accommodation and great quality catering.

    What was the most inspirational moment of your trip?

    Reaching the summit of Kilimanjaro together, as a couple, was one of the most emotional (in a positive way) experiences we've had. The multi-sensory experience of being close to so many of the iconic African animals while on safari really brought home to us how important they are for us all.

    What did you think of your group leader?

    Both our Kilimanjaro leader and safari leader were highly professional and knowledgeable. They conveyed a respect for their environments as well as a love of their country, Tanzania. They were totally trustworthy and a credit to themselves and that country.

    Do you have any advice for potential travellers?

    Read the trip notes very carefully and take note of the advice. The notes are very accurate so there should be no surprises or disappointments if you take them into account. Be prepared for your legs and knees to suffer a wee bit being folded into a Land Rover for a few days immediately after 8 days of walking and climbing.

    Is there anything else you would like to add?

  • 10

    Kilimanjaro by lemosho and safari

    The climb and safari exceeded our expectations. Yes Africa worked it's magic but the local Exodus staff did a brilliant job to make experiencing it easy!

    What was the most inspirational moment of your trip?

    Dawn on the rim of the crater.

    What did you think of your group leader?

    Charles on Kilimanjaro was excellent. Knew his stuff and organised his team with quiet efficiency. Also supportive of all his customers, and helped us achieve our goals. 100 per cent to the roof of Africa was not a surprise.

    Do you have any advice for potential travellers?

    A bit of fitness before hand helps. Know your kit. Listen to your guides, there knowledge is vast and they want to share it!

    Is there anything else you would like to add?

    Exodus flight arrangements could be better. Why were we given a 7 hour changeover at Heathrow on the way back when there was an earlier flight with a still generous 3 hour transfer which others were offered? When we found this out we could not change with BA. Outbound through Addis there was no food or drinks in transit. This should be flagged in advance.

  • 10

    Woo hoo I did it and loved every minute

    Mind blowing, tough but achievable, great sense of achievement, guides and crew were all fantastic and thankfully the trek was not as busy as I expected. Would do it again and again

    What was the most inspirational moment of your trip?

    When I was petrified about going up the Barranco wall, was given so much support from all my guides, that it made me feel it was achievable and I did it with their help no problems.

    What did you think of your group leader?

    JT (Justin Thomas) was a fantastic leader, very helpful and always had a big smile on his face, gave lots of encouragement when required, lots of interesting facts about Kimbo, the wildlife and flora. Had a good relationship with his crew and was well organised. His assistant guides Viviano, Saidi, Jacob and Lazaro were all excellent.

    Do you have any advice for potential travellers?

    Embrace the challenge, listen to the guides they know what they are doing and are very helpful and good at their job. Open your heart to Killi and enjoy it

    Is there anything else you would like to add?

    This was by far the best trip I have every had, I loved it and would do it again without hesitation, I would also make sure I had the same team The Dream team. JT and his crew, they we're fantastic all the way, have made some good friends for life. Thank you Exodus. May I also say the food up Killi was out of this world. The safari was also magical and our driver/guide Alex Martin was very knowledgeable knew his animals etc very well, it was a fantastic end my trip. Go do it you'll love it

  • 10

    KILIMANJARO - LEMOSHO ROUTE AND SAFARI

    Fantastic trip - even better than I anticipated.  I loved it and have talked of nothing else since I came home!

    What was the most inspirational moment of your trip?

    So much to choose from - the stars at night were spectacular, the views from our tent in the mornings, the gradual journey up the mountain and of course reaching the summit.   Overall - the fact I'd travelled to Africa on my own, met a group of strangers and was camping and climbing Kilimanjaro and loving it was just amazing   

    What did you think of your group leader?

    Abraham was fantastic.  He knew the mountain so well and was obviously extremely experienced.  He was attentive to all of us, checking how we were feeling twice a day and giving calm sensible advice.  My tent mate struggled significantly with the altitude and he looked after her (and all of us) so well.  I felt very safe with him in charge.   All the guides were supportive and encouraging, monitoring us and looking after us every step (literally) of the way. We wouldn't have got up there without them!

    Do you have any advice for potential travellers?

    I was worried how I would cope with the altitude and the unpredictable nature of it before I went.  I took diamox with me with the intention of taking it from the start but decided not too as other travellers put me off with talk of side effects etc.  By the second night I had a headache but it was treatable with paracetamol and ibuprofen (on and off I kept taking this for the rest of the trip and it always worked) - so take plenty and take both!!  By camp on day 3 I felt dizzy and a bit sick (a bit like being travel sick) - I started diamox (which my GP had prescribed) then. Other than a recurring (but manageable) headache, I was fine for the rest of the trip.   I noticed the effects of altitude e.g. getting out of bed in the middle of the night to go to the loo then climbing back into the tent/ sleeping bag left me breathless like I'd been sprinting and that was walking slowly!   We all followed the guides' advice - walked pole, pole (slowly, slowly), drank loads of water (LOADS - hence up to loo at night!) ate the delicious food served and rested when advised.  All but one of us was on diamox by summit night and 8 out of 12 of us made it to the summit (for some people they unfortunately didn't make the summit - in some cases because of pre-existing health problems).  I had read loads about how hard it was, esp summit night.  It was hard - but in my experience, it was do-able - just walking SO slowly behind Abraham, steadly picking our way up the mountain, crossing off the metres as he told us how high we were. I was lucky with the altitude - as were several of us - though we did all feel it in different ways (breathlessness when walking, heart racing, legs out of energy etc) but it wasn't (for me) nearly as difficult as I expected. As I say though, I was lucky and others in the group had a much much tougher time with the altitude.   If you are well prepared, follow the advice, pick a good company (like Exodus) where you will be well looked after and kept safe and pick a slow route to allow you to aclimatise - I think your chances of making the summit are good.  Even if you don't though, the experience is amazing - views the whole way up are beautiful and chances are you'll be spending a week with like minded people - our group was fab - friendly, kind and supportive of one and other and also good fun.  I went on my own which I've never done before and I felt completely part of the group the whole time - it just wasn't an issue.   Invaluable items -   merino wool leggings and top (well several tops).  We put these on when washing at camp in the evening - it gets very cold as soon as the sun goes down.  I wore mine to sleep in from first camp - wouldnt bother with pjs earplugs - some camps are busy and can be a bit noisy Head torch - for getting about camp at night and summit night  toilet roll - you need this for nipping behind rocks during the day vasaline and a good sun/ wind protector for lips  platypus for water Camera and keep it handy for taking photos all the way.  I got a spare battery for mine though didn't need it   I hired the down jacket - it was very big on me and had to borrow a waterproof jacket that would fit over the top of it (though in the end this wasn't needed). The jacket was SO cosy though - I wasn't cold at all on summit night (neither was the other girl in the group who had hired the down jacket) - I was even wearing one less layer than recommended.....which isn't like me - I'm usually too cold! I didn't hire walking poles - they were marked as optional on the kit list - I've never used them and so decided not to bother.  The guides in Africa were a bit concerned about this as they felt they are important for resting on on summit night/ and to help you on way back down the mountain.  I was ok without them - but I got off lightly altitude wise I think - so it might be worth considering hiring these.  In terms of training - I went hillwalking once a week.  I live in Scotland so have easy access to munros - built up to doing 3 in a day and on one day 5.  I had meant to exercise through the week.....but with work pressures, never quite got round to it.  Early on on the mountain the walking pole, pole felt easy and relaxing - time to admire the view and chat instead of rushing like at home - higher up we needed to go pole pole but my training felt sufficient.  Fitness doesn't help with chances against altitude anyway (or so I've been told)....but it does help with climbing a mountain. Finally - I took an old pair of leather walking boots which were leaking to give away - I gave them to Abraham at the start of the walk as thought no point in bringing them up the mountain.  He produced them at the tipping ceremony at the end - the porter that got them looked delighted - possibly the most delighted I've ever seen anyone look (and the chances are my leaking boots that I would otherwise have just thrown away would be too small for him) - very humbling experience.

    Is there anything else you would like to add?

    For me the trip was about Kilimanjaro but I'd never been to Africa before and I wanted to see the animals while I was there - how could you go that far and not.  It makes a nice relaxing end to the trip and is well worth doing.  Our guide was great at spotting animals and we saw everything I'd wanted to see - including a Rhino......in the distance.....if you squinted your eyes and used your imagination! I decided to share a tent though was nervous about this - it was a great decision - my tent mate was lovely and because we got on it was really nice to have the company.....and share the odd bottle of wine on safari. She was also far braver than me when it came to dealing with the spiders in our tent on safari (don't panic - there were only 2 - it was a one off - but hope for a brave tent mate.....or bring one)! Other than tips and few glasses of wine on safari/ few presents for niece and nephew I hardly spent any money. Overall - it was an amazing experience - one of the best things I've ever done - I would highly recommend it.  

  • 10

    KILIMANJARO - LEMOSHO ROUTE AND SAFARI

    This is a well run and organised trip and I was fortunate to have such great fellow travellers. I would highly recommend this trip.

    What was the most inspirational moment of your trip?

    Standing on top of Mount Kilimanjaro. I've been on several safaris previously and without a doubt the Serengeti is by far he best, we saw all the big cats.

    What did you think of your group leader?

    JT was amazing, such a friendly, cheerful chap. Completely on the ball and well organised. It would be a pleasure to travel with him again. The porters support was invaluable, such a friendly bunch of lads.

    Do you have any advice for potential travellers?

    Get yourself fit for Kilimanjaro and hire your kit, instead of bringing your own so that you more room in your travel bag for personal items.

    Is there anything else you would like to add?

  • 10

    KILIMANJARO - LEMOSHO ROUTE AND SAFARI

    This was just a fantastic trip.  I cannot fault the organisation of the Kilimanjaro climb itself - it was just perfect.  I am also very glad that I booked through Exodus, which uses the The Africa Walking Company as its local operator.   They had the best camping set-up that we saw on the mountain, particularly the much appreciated toilet tent!  The guides and porters were universally good and seemed to provide that little bit more than the other operators on the mountain.  The safari was also excellent - the only negative point was that we were meant to have a group leader to meet us and drop us off at the airport, but it seems like he could not allocate the time.  The safari drivers did a great job getting us to the right places and making sure we saw all our 'wish list' (!) of animals, however, and mostly made up for the lack of group leader.  It was an excellent and satisfying trip all round.

    What was the most inspirational moment of your trip?

    1.  Making it to the top of Kilimanjaro.  The final day of climbing was tiring and a bit chilly, but was absolutely worth the effort. 2.  Seeing my first families of elephants, lions and hippos, and then seeing cheetahs, a leopard and crocodiles.  The vervet monkeys and baboons were also great!

    What did you think of your group leader?

    Musa, our Chief Guide on Kilimanjaro, was superb.  He was intelligent, humerous and quietly observant throughout the trip, with a complete understanding of British traits!  He had a really lovely manner and ensured that any issues were identified and dealt with as soon as possible.  He also spent a lot of time developing the other guides so they had the full range of skills needed to be a Chief Guide in the future.  He was the perfect choice for the role. Our group leader on the safari was the complete opposite.  He didn't meet us on the first day of the safari and left the drivers to sort out our divided luggage.  On the final day, he did come to meet us, but decided belatedly not to take us to the airport (where we could have done with some explanation about forms and queues).  The drivers, as I said above, did their best to make sure his absence did not impact on us, however. 

    Do you have any advice for potential travellers?

    1.  Make sure you take the full packing list as the layers are definitely needed on the final morning's climb to the summit.  Bring your gaiters as they help keep the mud (if you are unlucky enough to get rain) off your laces, which is welcome when you get to camp and can relax again. 2.  Ensure all your kit is water-proofed inside your main bag, as it rained for our first 4 days and the bags (and contents) did get wet despite the additional cover added by the tour company.   3.  Ensure you have a rain cover for your day sack and good-quality waterproofs.   4.  Our packing list only said 2 x 1 litre water bottles - bring 3 or preferably a camelbak and 2 extra bottles. 5.  Don't bring water purification tablets as the water is purified for you on the mountain. 

    Is there anything else you would like to add?

    I would absolutely recommend booking through Exodus!  It is a little bit more expensive than most other comapanies, but it was definitely worth it.  The Africa Walking Company is a great local operator and we ended up in a lovely group of people.  I would say that Exodus could personalise the emails it sends out after booking and before the trip - they were too generic and left you searching around for specific information on the Kilimanjaro trek (not just all treks) and little was mentioned on the safari organisation.  Apart from this and the guide problem on the safari, the trip went perfectly and I will now have great memories that will be with me for life.

  • 10

    KILIMANJARO - LEMOSHO ROUTE AND SAFARI

    The trip was very well organised, and the accomodation was great throughout. We were incredibly well looked after on the mountain and the safari.

    What was the most inspirational moment of your trip?

    Seeing the top of Kilimanjaro for the first time when the cloud cleared on the 3rd day of the climb was incredible.   Reaching Stella Point at the crater rim and looking back over the clouds below us and rising sun. Seeing a pride of lions sheltering under a tree from the heat of the sun after returning from a hunt, 17 lions and cubs preening and cleaning, amazing! 

    What did you think of your group leader?

    Musa, our leader on the climb was amazing!  He was so attentive to everybody in the group. His knowledge of the mountain and the climb was second to none.  He organised our huge group of porters and guides with ease and always made to time to speak to people individually to see how they were getting on.

    Do you have any advice for potential travellers?

    Make sure you train well before you go, and have a comfortable day pack that you have got used to before you go. You also need to pack for all weather conditions. From suncream to waterproofs and a scarf and gloves, the weather is very changeable.  Take a Poncho! It doesnt need to be anything expensive, just something that will go over a rucksack on your back and can be left open at the front to keep you cool while walking. The first few days can be quite wet, half the battle with getting through these days is staying dry. I hired a poncho when I arrived, and was the only one in a group of 11 to use one. Some of the group wearing expensive waterproof coats ended up getting very wet, and wished they had a poncho instead! Stay positive on the mountain is vital. Yes it is very hard, but if you keep your spirits up when it gets tough, you'll get to the top! 

    Is there anything else you would like to add?

    The whole trip was amazing.  It was without a doubt the hardest thing I have ever done, but the most incredible experience at the same time. The group cameraderie is so cool, everyone in our group really gelled and it helped a great deal.   The porters and guides are inspirational! They work soooo hard almost 24/7 to make sure you are well cared for and that they give you the best chance of getting to the top, we certainly wouldn't have made it without them! 

  • 10

    KILIMANJARO - LEMOSHO ROUTE AND SAFARI

    Experience of a lifetime,absolutely fantastic

    What was the most inspirational moment of your trip?

    seeing kilimanjaro in the background of the foothills,and thinking on thursday the 20/9/12 i will be on the summit of that massive rock.

    What did you think of your group leader?

    Florence was our group leader,you could not fault him,he would ask all the rite questions about how you were feeling,your welfare was his main concern,i cant praise him enough,all the other guides were exellent to,Solaman,Hudson,Freeman,Augustus,and David all the porters and Milton the cook,what a fantastic job he did feeding us,the food was top notch.

    Do you have any advice for potential travellers?

    Go slowly,eat and drink plenty,tell your guides how you are feeling,and listen to them they no all the symptoms,i was lucky i ate and drunk like a horse and i had no altitude sickness .

    Is there anything else you would like to add?

    If you decide to book this trip you will be satisfied with the care and attention of the guides,the food,and the friendlyness of the very very hard working porters,just a name mention of the porters who made my trip special,Julious who took my pack and poles off me and showed me to my tent at the end of each day and then on summit day slept in my tent and looked after my belonings,Milton the cook for creating such a variety of meals and kept us all fed,Cast Florences brother,for bowls of hot water for washy washy and just a kind hearted lad,Fredie,Welhud,and all the other porters for making our trip fantastic.

  • 10

    KILIMANJARO - LEMOSHO ROUTE AND SAFARI

    Exodus have been superb. Everything happened like clock work and we cannot thank the Exodus team enough. All the staff at Exodus, The African Walking Company both on Kilimanjaro and on safari, hotels, lodges, camp sites and Kenya Airways displayed excellent standards of customer service and have all made our trip not only spectacular but one we will remember for a life time. Our safari guide, Omari knows the Serengeti and Ngorongoro Crater like it is his own back yard. An incredible trip and experience. Our guide on Kilimanjaro, Naiman truly is a very special person. His team, Joseph and himself looked after us beyond what ever we could have expected. We are speechless. They were BRILLIANT.

    What was the most inspirational moment of your trip?

    We can honestly say, after running 2 marathons, this was the toughest challenge of the 3 Continents Challenge. Each day we walked for approximately 6 hours, slowly walking higher and higher. After day 3 (we had reached 3,840 metres), we both started to feel mild altitude sickness. It comes on very quick and you just want to rest. We managed to acclimatise but on day 4 we walked to a height of 4,550 metres. We had been walking through rain forests and grass plateau's but now the terrain was rocky lava ridges. I did not feel too good and I also discovered I had a fear of falling over. I was ok with the height but if the terrain became very steep and uneven surfaces, I became very nervous. We discussed with Naiman and he suggested I did not take any more malaria tablets and I had some Ibuprofen and Diamox to help me acclimatise. He told us, we were only suffering normal symptoms and we were a very strong group. I went to bed to sleep on it. We camped at 3,900 metres. The nights were now getting cold and were approximately -5. I woke in the morning realising the only way down was up and I had to overcome my fear. So yet again I faced a massive wall to climb. I had to keep going despite the fact it was now getting so tough. I had to rely on all my training, all my fitness and all my goals. I also had the most important person in my life by my side and together we would do it. So I started day 5 and quite literally had the biggest challenge of my life, to climb the Great Barranco Wall, a 300 metre rock face to take us to 4,200 metres. Each step was hard and I used my entire body strength to help me climb and overcome my fear. We made it and after 2 more days of climbing to reach 4,600 metres we rested to prepare ourselves for the midnight climb to the summit. We reached the summit at Uhuru Peak on day 7, Thursday 23 February at 06.50am. Our bodies and fitness were put to the test on Summit Day when we climbed for 7 hours while temperatures fell to -12. It was an incredible feeling to not only have done this amazing challenge but to have completed the 3 Continents Challenge. But the story does not end there and whilst at Uhuru Peak, I asked my girlfriend, Teresa to marry me by proposing with a ring I had carried for the last 7 days. The great news is she said YES.

    What did you think of your group leader?

    There was a team of 18 staff to help and assist us including our chef, Johnson, Waiter, Stanley, Assistant Guide, Joseph and our leader and Head Guide, Naiman. We would like to say, without the incredible patience, team work, encouragement and determination of these guys, we would not have made it. They looked after us beyond belief. We had fantastic food, lots of fun and Naiman is with out doubt the most incredible person we have ever met.

    Do you have any advice for potential travellers?

    Although you will have to overcome many things you may never have encountered before in your life, relax and enjoy every moment. It is a life changing experience and reaching the summit is mind blowing! We also suggest be prepared, take all the advice you can before you go and listen to those who have done it. Exodus can give you all the answers so do not hesitate to ask questions.

    Is there anything else you would like to add?

    In 2008 I started to plan the 3 Continents Challenge. In February 2012, one year after I had started my training, I was ready to start my final and third challenge, to climb and reach the summit of Uhuru Peak on Mount Kilimanjaro in Tanzania. I have had a great time so far and achieved some personal bests; The Virgin London Marathon, Sunday 17 April 2011, 4 hours, 49 minutes, 29 seconds. The ING New York City Marathon, Sunday 6 November 2011, 4 hours, 13 minutes beating my London time by 36 minutes. In June, thanks to my Just Giving page, I met a beautiful lady called Teresa. We started dating and Teresa decided join me for the final part of my challenge. Over the winter months Teresa and I were busy training and preparing for the trip. To start training again was tough enough but to maintain the training has been the toughest part of the challenges. After aches, pains, tears and vaccinations, we were ready, fit and healthy. So after over 800 miles (running), 800 litres of Highland Spring and 800 bananas, we climbed Mount Kilimanjaro in 8 days. We left London on 15 February and started the climb on 17 February for 7 days. We chose to climb the Lemosho route which is a longer route but we knew the extra days would help us to acclimatise. No training could prepare us to know how well we would acclimatise, however the longer we were on the mountain, the better the chances we had to reach the summit. There was 3 of us on our trip, A soldier called David, Teresa and my self. Friday 17 February Day 1. After flying from London and staying at a local hotel for a night we started the climb at a place called Londorossi Gate at approximately 2000 metres. After registration we started walking through the rain forest at the Lemosho Road Head. We slowly rose through the forest seeing monkeys and many different birds. It was warm (28 degrees) and sunny. Our porters carried all our kit, tents and food on their heads. Each one had a specific job. We carried back packs with any personal items and extra clothing rain wear. We reach our first camp at 4.30pm (Lemosho Forest Camp, 2750m). We arrived to find our tents are put up, snacks and hot chocolate and even a clean private toilet for us. We had an excellent evening meal and Naiman breifed us for the next day. After prayers we were in bed by 9pm. We were woke at 6.30am with hot tea or coffee and water to wash. After an amazing breakfast we set off through more rain forests. The track was now becoming steeper and narrower as we walked up and down. Again it was sunny and a temperature of about 18. We saw more monkeys and birds and soon walked out of the forest and onto moorland. We saw Chameleon on the moorland and had some amazing views across the plains. Although we stopped frequently, we had decided not to waste our camera batteries as the low temperatures we would start to experience could affect our battery life. We came across lots of dead white butterflies who were being blown up the mountain by the wind. They were dying because of the altitude. We climbed over the Shira Ridge to reach the Shira Plateau. This was our next camp site, Shira One (3550m). Again we arrived to find our tents are put up, snacks and hot chocolate. Another excellent evening meal and after Naiman breifed us for the next day and our prayers we were in bed by 9pm again. The night temperature dropped for the first time below freezing (-5), however we were warm in our tents. Again we woke at 6.30am and after tea, washing and breakfast we set off over moorland and volcanic rock. We came across fresh buffalo and jackal droppings. It was Sunday and we were able to climb up to Shira Cathedral, a large rock surrounded by spire formations. At the summit (3750m) we said prayers. We then reached our next campsite, Shira Hut (3840m). After day 3 (we had reached 3,840 metres), both Teresa and my self started to feel mild altitude sickness. It comes on very quick and you just want to rest. We managed to acclimatise but on day 4 we walked to a height of 4,550 metres. We had been walking through rain forests and grass plateau's but now the terrain was rocky lava ridges. After climbing the Great Barranco Wall and taking time to acclimatise, we reached the summit at Uhuru Peak on day 7, Thursday 23 February at 06.50am. Our bodies and fitness were put to the test on Summit Day when we climbed for 7 hours while temperatures fell to -12. Coming down was quick and after spending our last night on the mountain (our porters sang local songs and cooked a traditional meal), we virtually ran the rest of the way down. In 2 hours 50 minutes we were back in rain forests. This has truly been an incredible story, life changing, meeting some amazing people and overcoming disabilities some people have to suffer their entire life. It has been so rewarding knowing our efforts can change someone's life for the better. We believed in it and WE DID IT.

  • 8

    KILIMANJARO - LEMOSHO ROUTE AND SAFARI

    The Kilimanjaro part of the trip was excellent. The guides and porters were superb, couldn't ask for more. For me the safari section of the trip was a bit long but again the guide was excellent and the accomodation was first class.

    What was the most inspirational moment of your trip?

    Reaching the summit at sunrise was special.

    What did you think of your group leader?

    Our group leader was excellent, he was very experienced.

    Do you have any advice for potential travellers?

    If you can, get the yellow fever vaccination and take the certificate with you. Since you transfer through Kenya the Tanzanian authorities ask to see the certificate on landing (although they let me through without one).

    Is there anything else you would like to add?

    During the safari we had an option to go on a night drive and a sunrise walking safari. The night drive cost $30 and the walking safari was $20, which weren't mentioned in the trip notes. I went on the sunrise walking safari which was a good experience, i would recomend it.

  • 10

    KILIMANJARO - LEMOSHO ROUTE AND SAFARI

    What a fantastic experience - the Lemosho route offers the opportunity to see 3 sides of Kilimanjaro and around every corner was a different landscape more inspiring than the one before. A key benefit of the Lemosho route is allowing the time to fully acclimatise over 6 days on the way up meaning a more relaxed walk - though never easy! The support provided by the African Walking Company was superb and nothing was ever too much trouble. Finishing the trip off with a safari was the perfect balance and a way for our success to slowly sink in - helped by a few beers around a camp fire in the middle of the Serengeti - does it get any better?

    What was the most inspirational moment of your trip?

    Standing on top of Shira Catherdral and watching the clouds part to show Shira Needle and the valley beyond - appearing like a lost world.

    What did you think of your group leader?

    Charles from the African Walking Company was always calm, assured and encouraging. His knowledge of the mountain and the correct medication to take were crucial in all of the group successfully summitting without any problems. Whilst our Safari guide was not the most communicative, you could not fault his ability to find the action. Within just 3 days we'd seen the 'big 5' including a real life kill and more birds and animals then we could have dreamed of seeing - never mind getting up close to.

    Do you have any advice for potential travellers?

    We climbed Kilimanjaro during February - the dry season - and completely under estimated the amount of dirt and dust which was around. At some of the camp sites it was blowing around and quickly everything became coated in a small layer of dirt. It wasn't a problem, but go prepared and take every opportunity to 'wash wash' and keep electronic gear, espcially cameras, covered.

    Is there anything else you would like to add?

    I put off climbing Kilimanjaro for many years as the cost always seemed too high - especially when you add in the required equipment and injections - but is was all worth it and wish I'd just got on and done it sooner. Beware - once you've done one trip like this, it gets addictive! 

  • 8

    KILIMANJARO - LEMOSHO ROUTE AND SAFARI

    An amazing 2 weeks, I loved the 8 day trek and would do it again, with stunning scenery/views and with good company, across both the group, guides and porters. The safari was a great introduction to safari and covered such a wide area (and animals!) in such a short period of time across the Ngorongoro Crater and Serengeti.  

    What was the most inspirational moment of your trip?

    Just being on the trek was amazing in itself and being able to appreciate the scenery which changed every day as we crossed the different zones. Getting to the top of the Baranco wall, which looks pretty awesome from the bottom! Seeing the trail of lights making their way up on summit night and of course making it to the top of Kili in time for sunrise! Not to mention what I learnt about myself during the final ascent!   Seeing a cheetah chase from start to finish, although the gazelles escaped on this occaision! 

    What did you think of your group leader?

    Our trek guide was Charles, supported by assistant guides Damasi, Hasheem and Senani.  Charles was friendly, knowledgable, informative and always had our best interests at heart.  We would receive briefings each morning and evening, from everything from where we were going, information on the Mountain and area, to what to wear.  Charles was always asking us how we were, making sure that none of us were suffering from the effects of altitude sickness.  Charles and the assistant guides were a credit to Exodus and the African Walking Company.  Damasi deserves a particular mention as he got me to the top of the mountain! Gabrielle was our Safari guide and again could not be faulted in his knowledge or his ability to change a tyre twice in the space of about an hour!

    Do you have any advice for potential travellers?

    I am a single traveller, but yet again I joined a group which was well suited and easy to get on with and we have met up since returning to exchange stories. Forget the sun tops, although a sun hat with a wide brim is a must! Although its warm during the day and a t-shirt and shorts (for the first few days at least) will be fine, it gets quite cold at night.  Make sure you have plenty of warm clothing and hire a duvet jacket and sleeping bag for collection when you get there.  I had a thermarest which was fine, but the hired mats also went down well with the rest of the group, as did the walking poles, although I did without.

    Is there anything else you would like to add?

    I would definitely recommend the 8 day trek along the Lemosho route, not only was it a stunning route, it was quiet with very few other trekers, at least until all the routes start to converge, it also gave you enough time to acclimatise and just enjoy the experience! It has definitely been my best holiday yet and will prove very hard to beat!  I read a review on the Exodus website before I booked which said, stop thinking about it and just book it today!  I have to agree, do it today!! 

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