< Terug naar resultaten

Veelgestelde vragen

  •  

    What are the facilities like camping on the Inca Trail?

     

    • About 500 people start the trek everyday during peak season, we have the experience and the know-how to avoid the crowds and queues (call us if you want to hear some of our secrets!).

    • We have great gear and choose the best campsites - 25 years of relationship building and knowledge pays off!

    • We take chemical loos so each group has private facilities and doesn't need to share the less than pleasant "public toilets".

    • We have permanent staff in Cuzco whose sole job is to ensure all tents are in tip top condition for each trek. All tents are set up and ready for when you arrive in camp in the afternoon so you can truly relax as soon as you finish your walking.

    • While many operators provide their clients with just a thin foam mattress, we use proper thermarests to ensure a good nights sleep!

    • Our excellent cooks prepare delicious, filling and fresh meals including 3 course dinners and hearty lunches.

    • We know the little extras that make a great trek an incredible trek: morning tea is delivered to your tent to get you going for the day, along with a bowl of hot water to wash in, and if it's a chilly night, hot water bottles are passed round after dinner to warm up your sleeping bag.

    Dan Cockburn - Product Manager

  •  

    What is the food like when camping in the Andes?

    When you are trekking in the mountains, the cooks that are with you can whip up all sorts of amazing meals. Breakfast can consist of toast, porridge, scrambled eggs, or pancakes, and they will make sure you are well fed for the walk ahead that day. Lunches consist of chicken, soups, salads and noodles dishes. Dinners almost always consists of three courses, so you wont ever be hungry when walking!

    Dan Cockburn - Product Manager

  •  

    Tips from staff who have been to Peru

    Altitude
    I wasn't affected greatly by altitude but there are two ways of looking at it. There is being affected where you suffer symptoms of altitude sickness, which can be very serious. But then there is just feeling, or your body being aware, of the altitude you're at. So this is much more common and covers feeling out of breath, tiredness, headaches, aching limbs - uncomfortable but quite common and not serious of treated with plenty of sleep, lots of drinking water, some headache tablets and taking it easy until your body acclimitises.
    If you're flying into Cuzco (as lost people do), then you'll probably feel it when you land. When I arrived I spent part of the afternoon sleeping, which helps. As long as you drink lots of water, take it VERY easy and don't exert yourself too much, you shouldn't have any problems. It's a good idea to have some Neurofen on hand, just in case of a headache though.
    If you get altitude sickness on trek, or begin to show symptoms of it, then you are usually taken down as quickly as possible. The exact details will depend on how bad you feel and where exactly you are but the leaders and guides are well versed in watching out for it.


    Weather
    It can be chilly at places like Puno and Cusco, as they are so high, but mainly in the evenings when the sun goes down. But the rest of the time it should be t-shirts as the weather should be sunny and blue skies. It can also be a bit windy in the Andean steppe.
    If you're doing the Moonstone trek, you do trek up to about 4570m, a pretty high altitude so temperatures will definitely drop compared to the rest of the trip. It's quite dry most of the year, which usually means lower temperatures as you'll have very clear skies at night and in the mornings. Once the sun comes up it should warm quickly but you should expect it to be possibly freezing or slightly below.
    In the Amazon it can be quite misty most of the time, and damp and tropical. There will be definitely sunshine, or there should be at least (if it's not cloudy or raining!).


    Equipment & clothing
    Layers are definitely the way to go. It can get down to freezing near Lake Titicaca, and a warm jacket is a must. I have a standard kind of padded jacket which did me, and a light fleece for other times. What else helps? A warm woolly hat, gloves, a warm scarf and some warm layers underneath. These are generally the things that will make life more comfortable. Some good sunglasses are a must as the sun is very strong at times and the glare can hurt your eyes.


    The Amazon
    If you're going into the Amazon for a couple of nights, you just take a small overnight bag. So if you're taking your own sleeping bag, it's left with your main bags in Peurto Maldonado.


    Money
    The leader will also help with advice on what amounts are best. I just took all dollars and changed it as I went along. You can use ATMs along the way, so don't need to take all cash.


    Gifts
    If you're doing the homestay on Lake Titicaca, it's traditional to take a gift for the family you're staying with. In terms of what to take, as they are such poor communities, practical gifts such as cooking oil and rice are best. The leader will help organise when you are on your way there, you don't take from home!

     

    Rebecca Caldicott - Peru Operations

     

  •  

    Can you give me more info on altitude sickness?

    You can find a comprehensive article covering this matter here: http://www.himalayanrescue.org/hra/article.php?sno=9

    Alex Doaga - Exodus leader

  •  

    Peru Country Guide (including plugs!)

    Please visit the Exodus Travel Guide to Peru where you can find out what plugs they use, as well as more detailed Country information in the menu on the left of the page.  

  •  

    What is the best way to take money for Peru?

    The best currency to take for Peru is US dollars, and then you can change small amounts into local Peruvian Sol as you need it. I would advise taking smaller denomination dollar notes with you as most restaurants and shops will accept dollars as payment instead of Sol. There are also ATM machines in most of the cities, such as Lima, Cuzco, Puno and Arequipa. Peru is a relatively in-expensive country, meals tend to cost between $15-20 depending on what you drink (a beer costs approx $3 and soft drinks $1). Rebecca Caldicott - Peru Operations

  •  

    What is the food like in Peru?

    Peru has a great variety of food. Peru claims to be the home of the potatoes, so there are plenty of potato options available. The staple dish is chicken, but restaurants also offer a variety of beef dishes, and the more local delicacies of Alpaca and Guinea pig! Most meals are served with rice or potato. Peruvians also have a great love of Chinese and Italian food, so these are also almost always available. Local drinks include pisco and Andean beer! Rebecca Caldicott - Peru Operations

  •  

    What weather can I expect in Peru?

    Peru has a very varied climate. Between April and November is the dry season. The Amazon stays very warm throughout the year, with temperatures in the high twenties and early thirties, with humidity, and a very small chance of rain. Along the coast, the temperature will be in the mid twenties earlier in the year, getting colder July – September. In the sacred valley the temperature will be a little lower than that of the coast, and as you get closer to Machu Picchu and the cloud forest it will get colder and there will be more cloud cover. In the Andes, and around Lake Titicaca, because of the altitude it will be colder, dropping into the low teens and even possibly single figures between July and September. Rebecca Caldicott - Peru Operations

  •  

    Is drinking water readily available?

    Bottled water is available everywhere in Peru. If you are doing the Inca Trail, the cooks treat the water and the leader makes sure everyone has plenty throughout the trek. Olly Leicester - Sales

  •  

    Any tips for some local food or drink to try in Lima?

    If you want to truly immerse yourself into Peruvian culture, then you need to try the local delicacy that is roast Guinea Pig or Alpaca! They are very tasty, although the Guinea Pig can look rather off putting! The traditional drink in Peru is the Pisco Sour which is a cocktail made from Pisco (a liquor distilled from grapes), with lime juice, egg whites and bitters. Its very refreshing after a long day of sightseeing! Rebecca Caldicott - Peru Operations

  •  

    Are walking poles necessary?

    If you are used to walking with poles then they will be useful, especially when tackling those famous Inca steps! However they are not essential, and you can manage quite well without them. Rebecca Caldicott - Peru Operations

  •  

    I'm travelling via the US, do I need a visa?

    Most clients are eligible to travel via the US under the US Visa Waiver Programme, however to do this you must register for an ETA (Electronic Travel Authority). This must be done prior to departure - more details can be found at www.exodus.co.uk/usvisa. Rebecca Caldicott - Customer Operations

  •  

    Exodus staff - expertise on hand to help

    All the staff at Exodus share a passion for adventure travel, and are always happy to answer any questions you may have. You can find an expert for the area you are interested in here and can contact them to get further information. If you don't see your specific country listed, please email customerops@exodus.co.uk and they will get the answers you need!

  •  

    What are the facilities like camping on the Inca Trail?

      About 500 people start the trek everyday during peak season, we have the experience and the know-how to avoid the crowds and queues (call us if you want to hear some of our secrets!). We have great gear and choose the best campsites - 25 years of relationship building and knowledge pays off! We take chemical loos so each group has private facilities and doesn't need to share the less than pleasant "public toilets". We have permanent staff in Cuzco whose sole job is to ensure all tents are in tip top condition for each trek. All tents are set up and ready for when you arrive in camp in the afternoon so you can truly relax as soon as you finish your walking. While many operators provide their clients with just a thin foam mattress, we use proper thermarests to ensure a good nights sleep! Our excellent cooks prepare delicious, filling and fresh meals including 3 course dinners and hearty lunches. We know the little extras that make a great trek an incredible trek: morning tea is delivered to your tent to get you going for the day, along with a bowl of hot water to wash in, and if it's a chilly night, hot water bottles are passed round after dinner to warm up your sleeping bag. Dan Cockburn - Product Manager

  •  

    What is the food like when camping in the Andes?

    When you are trekking in the mountains, the cooks that are with you can whip up all sorts of amazing meals. Breakfast can consist of toast, porridge, scrambled eggs, or pancakes, and they will make sure you are well fed for the walk ahead that day. Lunches consist of chicken, soups, salads and noodles dishes. Dinners almost always consists of three courses, so you wont ever be hungry when walking! Dan Cockburn - Product Manager

  •  

    Tips from staff who have been to Peru

    AltitudeI wasn't affected greatly by altitude but there are two ways of looking at it. There is being affected where you suffer symptoms of altitude sickness, which can be very serious. But then there is just feeling, or your body being aware, of the altitude you're at. So this is much more common and covers feeling out of breath, tiredness, headaches, aching limbs - uncomfortable but quite common and not serious of treated with plenty of sleep, lots of drinking water, some headache tablets and taking it easy until your body acclimitises.If you're flying into Cuzco (as lost people do), then you'll probably feel it when you land. When I arrived I spent part of the afternoon sleeping, which helps. As long as you drink lots of water, take it VERY easy and don't exert yourself too much, you shouldn't have any problems. It's a good idea to have some Neurofen on hand, just in case of a headache though.If you get altitude sickness on trek, or begin to show symptoms of it, then you are usually taken down as quickly as possible. The exact details will depend on how bad you feel and where exactly you are but the leaders and guides are well versed in watching out for it. WeatherIt can be chilly at places like Puno and Cusco, as they are so high, but mainly in the evenings when the sun goes down. But the rest of the time it should be t-shirts as the weather should be sunny and blue skies. It can also be a bit windy in the Andean steppe. If you're doing the Moonstone trek, you do trek up to about 4570m, a pretty high altitude so temperatures will definitely drop compared to the rest of the trip. It's quite dry most of the year, which usually means lower temperatures as you'll have very clear skies at night and in the mornings. Once the sun comes up it should warm quickly but you should expect it to be possibly freezing or slightly below. In the Amazon it can be quite misty most of the time, and damp and tropical. There will be definitely sunshine, or there should be at least (if it's not cloudy or raining!). Equipment & clothingLayers are definitely the way to go. It can get down to freezing near Lake Titicaca, and a warm jacket is a must. I have a standard kind of padded jacket which did me, and a light fleece for other times. What else helps? A warm woolly hat, gloves, a warm scarf and some warm layers underneath. These are generally the things that will make life more comfortable. Some good sunglasses are a must as the sun is very strong at times and the glare can hurt your eyes. The AmazonIf you're going into the Amazon for a couple of nights, you just take a small overnight bag. So if you're taking your own sleeping bag, it's left with your main bags in Peurto Maldonado. MoneyThe leader will also help with advice on what amounts are best. I just took all dollars and changed it as I went along. You can use ATMs along the way, so don't need to take all cash. Gifts If you're doing the homestay on Lake Titicaca, it's traditional to take a gift for the family you're staying with. In terms of what to take, as they are such poor communities, practical gifts such as cooking oil and rice are best. The leader will help organise when you are on your way there, you don't take from home!   Rebecca Caldicott - Peru Operations  

  •  

    Can you give me more info on altitude sickness?

    You can find a comprehensive article covering this matter here: http://www.himalayanrescue.org/hra/article.php?sno=9 Alex Doaga - Exodus leader

  •  

    Peru Country Guide (including plugs!)

    Please visit the Exodus Travel Guide to Peru where you can find out what plugs they use, as well as more detailed Country information in the menu on the left of the page.  

  •  

    What is the best way to take money for Peru?

    The best currency to take for Peru is US dollars, and then you can change small amounts into local Peruvian Sol as you need it. I would advise taking smaller denomination dollar notes with you as most restaurants and shops will accept dollars as payment instead of Sol. There are also ATM machines in most of the cities, such as Lima, Cuzco, Puno and Arequipa. Peru is a relatively in-expensive country, meals tend to cost between $15-20 depending on what you drink (a beer costs approx $3 and soft drinks $1). Rebecca Caldicott - Peru Operations

  •  

    What is the food like in Peru?

    Peru has a great variety of food. Peru claims to be the home of the potatoes, so there are plenty of potato options available. The staple dish is chicken, but restaurants also offer a variety of beef dishes, and the more local delicacies of Alpaca and Guinea pig! Most meals are served with rice or potato. Peruvians also have a great love of Chinese and Italian food, so these are also almost always available. Local drinks include pisco and Andean beer! Rebecca Caldicott - Peru Operations

  •  

    What weather can I expect in Peru?

    Peru has a very varied climate. Between April and November is the dry season. The Amazon stays very warm throughout the year, with temperatures in the high twenties and early thirties, with humidity, and a very small chance of rain. Along the coast, the temperature will be in the mid twenties earlier in the year, getting colder July – September. In the sacred valley the temperature will be a little lower than that of the coast, and as you get closer to Machu Picchu and the cloud forest it will get colder and there will be more cloud cover. In the Andes, and around Lake Titicaca, because of the altitude it will be colder, dropping into the low teens and even possibly single figures between July and September. Rebecca Caldicott - Peru Operations

  •  

    Is drinking water readily available?

    Bottled water is available everywhere in Peru. If you are doing the Inca Trail, the cooks treat the water and the leader makes sure everyone has plenty throughout the trek. Olly Leicester - Sales

  •  

    Any tips for some local food or drink to try in Lima?

    If you want to truly immerse yourself into Peruvian culture, then you need to try the local delicacy that is roast Guinea Pig or Alpaca! They are very tasty, although the Guinea Pig can look rather off putting! The traditional drink in Peru is the Pisco Sour which is a cocktail made from Pisco (a liquor distilled from grapes), with lime juice, egg whites and bitters. Its very refreshing after a long day of sightseeing! Rebecca Caldicott - Peru Operations

  •  

    Are walking poles necessary?

    If you are used to walking with poles then they will be useful, especially when tackling those famous Inca steps! However they are not essential, and you can manage quite well without them. Rebecca Caldicott - Peru Operations

  •  

    I'm travelling via the US, do I need a visa?

    Most clients are eligible to travel via the US under the US Visa Waiver Programme, however to do this you must register for an ETA (Electronic Travel Authority). This must be done prior to departure - more details can be found at www.exodus.co.uk/usvisa. Rebecca Caldicott - Customer Operations

  •  

    Exodus staff - expertise on hand to help

    All the staff at Exodus share a passion for adventure travel, and are always happy to answer any questions you may have. You can find an expert for the area you are interested in here and can contact them to get further information. If you don't see your specific country listed, please email customerops@exodus.co.uk and they will get the answers you need!

  •  

    How do I join the Departure Lounge (forum) in the Exodus Community?

    To view the Forums, including the Departure Lounge, you do not need to be member of the Exodus Community, simply click on the Community link at the top of every page and read the posts in their respective sections by entering the Departure Lounge, or one of the other options in the list on the page.

    To join in a discussion, if already a member, please sign in to your Exodus website account (not related to booking reservations) to contribute to the Forum. If you are not a member of the Exodus Community, you can register by clicking the 'Sign in' at the top of every webpage and select ‘Register’ within the drop down panel.

    When viewing the Forum area of the website, as you scroll through the 'Rooms' which are set out by 'travel months' during the current year within the Departure Lounge. You can then select the 'month' of intended travel, then filter the list of trips that have already been created by fellow travellers to see if your trip is listed. If the trip you are travelling on is not in the list, you can start the process by clicking on the 'Post new forum topic' link above the list on the same page. If you do see your trip within the list, select it to view the 'discussion' by your fellow travellers and you can join in by completing the 'Post your comment' section below the discussion thread.

    Please note: there might be slight a delay before your post/comment appears as intended because we moderate what is published on the website.

    We hope you enjoy using the Departure Lounge to meet your fellow travellers and continue to contribute right up to the start of your journey with Exodus.

  •  

    What is the Moonstone Trek and how do I book it?

    When Inca Trail Permits have run out, we offer an alternative trek (not requiring a permit) in its place. For information about the alternative remote Moonstone Trek click here

  •  

    Can you tell me about the different Inca Trail trekking routes?

    Yes! We have compiled our expert knowledge into an Inca Trail guide that you can download here. It contains all the information you need about the diffferent routes (the classic Inca Trail, the Moonstone Tek and the High Inca Trail), what to expect on trek, equipment required, and much more!

  •  

    How do I join the Departure Lounge (forum) in the Exodus Community?

    To view the Forums, including the Departure Lounge, you do not need to be member of the Exodus Community, simply click on the Community link at the top of every page and read the posts in their respective sections by entering the Departure Lounge, or one of the other options in the list on the page. To join in a discussion, if already a member, please sign in to your Exodus website account (not related to booking reservations) to contribute to the Forum. If you are not a member of the Exodus Community, you can register by clicking the 'Sign in' at the top of every webpage and select ‘Register’ within the drop down panel. When viewing the Forum area of the website, as you scroll through the 'Rooms' which are set out by 'travel months' during the current year within the Departure Lounge. You can then select the 'month' of intended travel, then filter the list of trips that have already been created by fellow travellers to see if your trip is listed. If the trip you are travelling on is not in the list, you can start the process by clicking on the 'Post new forum topic' link above the list on the same page. If you do see your trip within the list, select it to view the 'discussion' by your fellow travellers and you can join in by completing the 'Post your comment' section below the discussion thread. Please note: there might be slight a delay before your post/comment appears as intended because we moderate what is published on the website. We hope you enjoy using the Departure Lounge to meet your fellow travellers and continue to contribute right up to the start of your journey with Exodus.

  •  

    What is the Moonstone Trek and how do I book it?

    When Inca Trail Permits have run out, we offer an alternative trek (not requiring a permit) in its place. For information about the alternative remote Moonstone Trek click here, or to get a personal viewpoint of the holiday you may like to read Sue Kannenberg's blog.

  •  

    What are the facilities like camping on the Inca Trail?

     

    • About 500 people start the trek everyday during peak season, we have the experience and the know-how to avoid the crowds and queues (call us if you want to hear some of our secrets!).

    • We have great gear and choose the best campsites - 25 years of relationship building and knowledge pays off!

    • We take chemical loos so each group has private facilities and doesn't need to share the less than pleasant "public toilets".

    • We have permanent staff in Cuzco whose sole job is to ensure all tents are in tip top condition for each trek. All tents are set up and ready for when you arrive in camp in the afternoon so you can truly relax as soon as you finish your walking.

    • While many operators provide their clients with just a thin foam mattress, we use proper thermarests to ensure a good nights sleep!

    • Our excellent cooks prepare delicious, filling and fresh meals including 3 course dinners and hearty lunches.

    • We know the little extras that make a great trek an incredible trek: morning tea is delivered to your tent to get you going for the day, along with a bowl of hot water to wash in, and if it's a chilly night, hot water bottles are passed round after dinner to warm up your sleeping bag.

    Dan Cockburn - Product Manager

  •  

    What is the food like when camping in the Andes?

    When you are trekking in the mountains, the cooks that are with you can whip up all sorts of amazing meals. Breakfast can consist of toast, porridge, scrambled eggs, or pancakes, and they will make sure you are well fed for the walk ahead that day. Lunches consist of chicken, soups, salads and noodles dishes. Dinners almost always consists of three courses, so you wont ever be hungry when walking!

    Dan Cockburn - Product Manager

  •  

    Tips from staff who have been to Peru

    Altitude
    I wasn't affected greatly by altitude but there are two ways of looking at it. There is being affected where you suffer symptoms of altitude sickness, which can be very serious. But then there is just feeling, or your body being aware, of the altitude you're at. So this is much more common and covers feeling out of breath, tiredness, headaches, aching limbs - uncomfortable but quite common and not serious of treated with plenty of sleep, lots of drinking water, some headache tablets and taking it easy until your body acclimitises.
    If you're flying into Cuzco (as lost people do), then you'll probably feel it when you land. When I arrived I spent part of the afternoon sleeping, which helps. As long as you drink lots of water, take it VERY easy and don't exert yourself too much, you shouldn't have any problems. It's a good idea to have some Neurofen on hand, just in case of a headache though.
    If you get altitude sickness on trek, or begin to show symptoms of it, then you are usually taken down as quickly as possible. The exact details will depend on how bad you feel and where exactly you are but the leaders and guides are well versed in watching out for it.


    Weather
    It can be chilly at places like Puno and Cusco, as they are so high, but mainly in the evenings when the sun goes down. But the rest of the time it should be t-shirts as the weather should be sunny and blue skies. It can also be a bit windy in the Andean steppe.
    If you're doing the Moonstone trek, you do trek up to about 4570m, a pretty high altitude so temperatures will definitely drop compared to the rest of the trip. It's quite dry most of the year, which usually means lower temperatures as you'll have very clear skies at night and in the mornings. Once the sun comes up it should warm quickly but you should expect it to be possibly freezing or slightly below.
    In the Amazon it can be quite misty most of the time, and damp and tropical. There will be definitely sunshine, or there should be at least (if it's not cloudy or raining!).


    Equipment & clothing
    Layers are definitely the way to go. It can get down to freezing near Lake Titicaca, and a warm jacket is a must. I have a standard kind of padded jacket which did me, and a light fleece for other times. What else helps? A warm woolly hat, gloves, a warm scarf and some warm layers underneath. These are generally the things that will make life more comfortable. Some good sunglasses are a must as the sun is very strong at times and the glare can hurt your eyes.


    The Amazon
    If you're going into the Amazon for a couple of nights, you just take a small overnight bag. So if you're taking your own sleeping bag, it's left with your main bags in Peurto Maldonado.


    Money
    The leader will also help with advice on what amounts are best. I just took all dollars and changed it as I went along. You can use ATMs along the way, so don't need to take all cash.


    Gifts
    If you're doing the homestay on Lake Titicaca, it's traditional to take a gift for the family you're staying with. In terms of what to take, as they are such poor communities, practical gifts such as cooking oil and rice are best. The leader will help organise when you are on your way there, you don't take from home!

     

    Rebecca Caldicott - Peru Operations

     

  •  

    Can you give me more info on altitude sickness?

    You can find a comprehensive article covering this matter here: http://www.himalayanrescue.org/hra/article.php?sno=9

    Alex Doaga - Exodus leader

  •  

    Can you tell me about the different Inca Trail trekking routes?

    Yes! We have compiled our expert knowledge into an Inca Trail guide that you can download here. It contains all the information you need about the diffferent routes (the classic Inca Trail, the Moonstone Tek and the High Inca Trail), what to expect on trek, equipment required, and much more!

  •  

    Exodus staff - expertise on hand to help

    All the staff at Exodus share a passion for adventure travel, and are always happy to answer any questions you may have. You can find an expert for the area you are interested in here and can contact them to get further information. If you don't see your specific country listed, please email customerops@exodus.co.uk and they will get the answers you need!

  •  

    How do I join the Departure Lounge (forum) in the Exodus Community?

    To view the Forums, including the Departure Lounge, you do not need to be member of the Exodus Community, simply click on the Community link at the top of every page and read the posts in their respective sections by entering the Departure Lounge, or one of the other options in the list on the page.

    To join in a discussion, if already a member, please sign in to your Exodus website account (not related to booking reservations) to contribute to the Forum. If you are not a member of the Exodus Community, you can register by clicking the 'Sign in' at the top of every webpage and select ‘Register’ within the drop down panel.

    When viewing the Forum area of the website, as you scroll through the 'Rooms' which are set out by 'travel months' during the current year within the Departure Lounge. You can then select the 'month' of intended travel, then filter the list of trips that have already been created by fellow travellers to see if your trip is listed. If the trip you are travelling on is not in the list, you can start the process by clicking on the 'Post new forum topic' link above the list on the same page. If you do see your trip within the list, select it to view the 'discussion' by your fellow travellers and you can join in by completing the 'Post your comment' section below the discussion thread.

    Please note: there might be slight a delay before your post/comment appears as intended because we moderate what is published on the website.

    We hope you enjoy using the Departure Lounge to meet your fellow travellers and continue to contribute right up to the start of your journey with Exodus.

  •  

    Are 2017 dates and prices available?

    Our experts can access lots of 2017 departures now, and we’ll be loading them on here soon. Meanwhile, you can call, email or use live chat to check 2017 dates, prices, availability and to book.

  •  

    How do I compare trips for my next adventure?

    To compare trips for consideration, you can add them to your 'Shortlist'.

    During your search for your next adventure you can save 'holidays' to your Shortlist and compare trips. For this to work correctly, you must be signed in during your 'user session'; i.e. during your time on the Exodus website. These will then be saved in your account (don't have an Exodus website account?  Sign up now!).

    The Shortlist menu item (top of every page) only appears when holidays are added. Adding holidays can be done by clicking on the 'Add to shortlist' with the 'Heart' symbol on any 'Holiday' page above the 'At a Glance' section, or in the 'holiday' panels within Search Results pages, or in the 'You might also like...' section at the foot of the trip page viewed. The selected holidays will be saved into your account for consideration and can be removed there, as well as from the 'compare trips' page from the menu link located at the top of every page.

Naar boven