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Food

  • Breakfast: hotel breakfasts are normally buffet-style; on trek they are more substantial and include a cooked dish. Lunch: while trekking, lunches generally include a hot main course. Lunches in the rainforest are either buffet lunches or picnics depending on the day's activities. Dinner: evening meals on trek are always cooked, and usually consist of soup or starter, a main course and dessert. Buffet dinners are provided in the rainforest. Water: while on the trek, you will be given drinking water (boiled and filtered) in the morning and at lunch to refill your water bottles.

Activities

  • Accom: camping
  • Accom: hotel/lodge
  • Adult group
  • Archaeology
  • History
  • Mixed-activity
  • Solo departures
  • Trek: point-to-point
  • Walking & Trekking
  • Guided Group
  • Food

    • All breakfasts, 7 lunches and 6 dinners are included in the price of the tour (one additional lunch is included on 2016 departures). Breakfast: hotel breakfasts are normally continental buffet-style; on trek they are more substantial and include a cooked dish such as porridge, omelette or pancakes. Lunch and dinner: on trek good quality three course cooked lunches and dinners are provided, and usually consist of soup or a starter, a main course with meat/fish and some form of carbohydrates, followed by a dessert. In the rainforest main meals are usually buffet style although some lunches may be picnics, depending on the day's activities. Drinks and water: drinking water (boiled and filtered) is provided in the mornings and at lunch during the trek so that you can refill your bottles. Bed tea/coffee is brought to your tent each morning and juice or hot drinks are provided with all meals during the trek.

    Activities

    • Historic Sites
    • Food

      • All breakfasts, 8 lunches and 6 dinners are included in the price of the tour. Breakfast: hotel breakfasts are normally continental buffet-style; on trek they are more substantial and include a cooked dish such as porridge, omelette or pancakes. Lunch and dinner: on trek good quality three course cooked lunches and dinners are provided, and usually consist of soup or a starter, a main course with meat/fish and some form of carbohydrates, followed by a dessert. In the rainforest main meals are usually buffet style although some lunches may be picnics, depending on the day's activities. Drinks and water: drinking water (boiled and filtered) is provided in the mornings and at lunch during the trek so that you can refill your bottles. Bed tea/coffee is brought to your tent each morning and juice or hot drinks are provided with all meals during the trek.
      • All breakfasts, 8 lunches and 6 dinners are included in the price of the tour. Breakfast: hotel breakfasts are normally continental buffet-style; on trek they are more substantial and include a cooked dish such as porridge, omelette or pancakes. Lunch and dinner: on trek good quality three course cooked lunches and dinners are provided, and usually consist of soup or a starter, a main course with meat/fish and some form of carbohydrates, followed by a dessert. In the rainforest main meals are usually buffet style although some lunches may be picnics, depending on the day's activities. Drinks and water: drinking water (boiled and filtered) is provided in the mornings and at lunch during the trek so that you can refill your bottles. Bed tea/coffee is brought to your tent each morning and juice or hot drinks are provided with all meals during the trek.

      Activities

      • Small Adult Group
      • Food

        • All breakfasts, 8 lunches and 6 dinners included in the price of the tour. Peruvian cuisine has developed a reputation for its flavours and originality and it’s well worth trying out a few of the local delicacies. Amongst these are ceviche (a spicy dish of seafood or fish marinated in lime juice), lomo saltado (a Peruvian take on a beef stir-fry) and various hearty soups such as the delicious quinoa soup. Other dishes include roasted cuy (guinea pig), alpaca steak, and to drink, the national beverage: Pisco Sour. Hotel breakfasts are normally simple buffet-style affairs, usually including bread/toast and jam, cereal, sometimes eggs or a cooked dishes, sometimes fruit, tea/coffee and fruit juice. Regrettably, we cannot guarantee that wheat/gluten-free products will be available for breakfast in all locations - if you have an intolerance you may wish to bring your own breakfast food. Lunches in the rainforest are either buffet lunches or picnics, depending on the day's activities. Dinners in the Amazon are buffet style, taken at the lodge During the Inca Trail (or Moonstone Trek) hearty breakfasts are served and good quality cooked lunches and dinners are provided, and usually consist of soup or a starter, a main course with meat/fish and some form of carbohydrates, followed by a dessert. Some snacks between meals are also provided. Drinking water (boiled and filtered) is provided in the mornings and at lunch during the trek so that you can refill your bottles. Bed tea/coffee is brought to your tent each morning and juice or hot drinks are provided with all meals during the trek. Where lunch and dinner is not included we'll visit a variety of cafes and restaurants. Drinking water is provided. The tap water in Peru is not safe to drink; boiled and filtered drinking water is provided on the trek and elsewhere your leader will buy large water containers for you to refill your bottle from.

        Activities

        • Point-to-point
        • Cultural Wonders
  • 1

    Start Lima; free afternoon.

    The group flights are scheduled to arrive this morning. Free arrival transfers are available for any flight as long as you have provided Exodus with your flight details in advance and have requested a transfer. Check-in is in the early afternoon, and the morning is free for you to explore the local area, change money or visit Lima's many museums until the rooms become available. There will be an Exodus noticeboard in the hotel reception with details of where and when the group welcome briefing will be held.  *Hotel El Tambo 1 (or similar)** *

  • 2

    Fly to Puerto Maldonado; boat journey into Tambopata Reserve; guided jungle walks.

    We have an early start today for the flight via Cuzco to Puerto Maldonado, a small jungle town. After a short drive via the lodge office (where we will store our main luggage) to the river, we take a boat to our jungle lodge in the Tambopata Reserve (generally between 1½ and 3 hours depending on the lodge used). On the way we may see caimans (alligators), river turtles and a wide variety of birdlife. Our rainforest lodge is basic but all accommodation has en suite facilities with cold showers. Electricity is by generator and only available for a few hours a day in the dining room area.  *Cayman Lodge (or similar)*

  • 3

    Jungle exploration including forest walks and boat trips.

    The next two days are spent exploring the forest, rivers and lakes surrounding the lodge, on foot and in both motorised and paddle canoes. Although a lot of the wildlife tends to hide in the dense foliage, we should expect to see a wide variety of birds, including herons and egrets, jacanas, macaws and the almost prehistoric-looking hoatzin, as well as several species of monkey, reptiles and insects, and with luck the Giant otters which live in the rivers of the Amazon basin. *Cayman Lodge (or similar)*

  • 5

    Fly to Cuzco (3400m); free time to explore the ancient capital replete with Inca buildings and Spanish churches.

    A dawn start is required for the boat trip back to Puerto Maldonado, giving memorable views of the sunrise over the river. Look out for the early morning wildlife, which is particularly active at this time. Howler monkeys are frequently heard as they stake out their territories. After our flight to Cuzco, there is usually time for an afternoon orientation tour of the city. At 3400m Cuzco is an extremely high city and you may find yourself short of breath on arrival. *Hotel Warari / Hotel Koyllur (or similar)** *

  • 6

    Free day; optional Sacred Valley excursion.

    We have a free day in Cuzco today. The Inca Capital is among the most attractive cities in South America, with many interesting buildings, museums and sites. There are various optional activities that can be arranged through your leader, such as a full day tour of the Sacred Valley (including the fortresses of Pisac and Ollantaytambo) or a visit to the ruins of Sacsayhuaman, situated on a hillside above the city. You will have a full trek briefing this afternoon (usually around 6pm). *Hotel Warari / Hotel Koyllur (or similar)*

  • 7

    Start Inca Trail trek from km82; walk along Urubamba River, climb to Huayllabamba.

    Those who are doing the Moonstone Trek will join a separate transfer to the trailhead - please refer to the https://assets.exodus.co.uk/pdf/tripnotes/tpm.pdf" target="_blank">Moonstone Trek trip notes for your trek itinerary. The Classic Inca Trail is a tangential branch part of a 45,000km road network linking the whole empire to Cuzco. It was built in the 15th Century to reach Machu Picchu but was abandoned soon after the Spanish conquest. American adventurer Hiram Bingham travelled along the trail when he came across Machu Picchu in 1911. The trail opened to the public in 1970. We leave Cuzco early and drive for roughly two hours to Ollantaytambo; our last chance to buy any items needed for the trek. From here we veer off the road and follow a track beside the river (45 minutes) to the start of the Inca Trail at Piscacucho, commonly known as Km82. After greeting our trekking crew we show our passports at the checkpoint and begin the Inca Trail trek. The trail runs alongside the Vilcanota River beneath the impressive snowcapped Nevado Veronica, passing through cactus gardens and fields of corn until we reach the enormous Inca ruins of Llactapata, where we continue up a side valley to camp near the hamlet of Huayllabamba. *Full-service Camping - Huayllabamba Camp*

  • 8

    Cross Dead Woman's Pass (4215m), then descend to Pacaymayu.

    This is the longest and most strenuous day of the trek. A long climb (largely up stone staircases) takes us first through an area of cloud forest to the meadows of Llulluchapampa, then over the Warmihuañusca (Dead Woman's) Pass, at 4215m the highest point on the trek. After quite a long, steep descent we camp in the scenic valley of the Pacamayo River (3600m). *Full-service Camping - Pacamayo Camp*

  • 9

    Over Runcuray Pass (3800m) to ruins of Sayajmarca and Phuyupatamarca.

    We start the day with an easier climb which takes us past the ruins of Runquracay and over the Runquracay Pass (3930m). From now on the Inca Trail becomes a clearly defined path made of flat boulders. We pass the ruins of Sayajmarca and suddenly enter rainforest; at one point the trail passes through an Inca tunnel. We camp at a spectacular campsite on the ridge above the Inca site of Phuyupatamarca (3680m) to benefit from the views of sunset and sunrise. *Full-service Camping - Phuyupatamarca Camp*

  • 10

    Walk down Inca steps to Wiñay Wayna and Machu Picchu via the Sun Gate.

    From the ridge, we embark on the infamous Inca steps: a two kilometre stone staircase taking us rapidly downhill amid a panorama of overwhelming immensity, with the peaks of the Vilcabamba range above and the river thousands of metres below. After visiting the attractive ruins of Wiñay Wayna, we have an undulating walk through cloud forest high above the river to Inti Punku, the Sun Gate. From here we get our first full sight of Machu Picchu itself, with Huayna Picchu rising behind. Traditionally busy with groups of trekkers clamouring for photos, we plan our arrival at Inti Punku later in the day so we can enjoy unobstructed views of the magnificent ruins. Passing around the edge of the ruins, we exit the site and descend to Aguas Calientes for a well-earned rest, a shower and a comfortable bed for the night. Our trekking permits allow us one entry into the site, which we use for our tour tomorrow, but anyone wishing to visit the citadel on both days can purchase an additional entry ticket today - your tour leader will assist with this. There is usually time for an optional visit to the hot springs in Aguas Calientes, however, in recent years they have become over-crowded and the water quality can suffer as a result. We will be reunited with those who have been on the Moonstone Trek at the hotel this afternoon. *Hotel Inti Punku El Tambo (or similar)*

  • 11

    Guided tour of Machu Picchu; return to Cuzco by train and by road.

    In order to beat the day-trippers arriving from Cuzco and reach the ruins as early as possible, a very early start is required to queue for Machu Picchu; only government-registered buses can make the 30-minute drive up the winding road to the site entrance and during high season (May-October) queues can be hours long.  Machu Picchu is one of the architectural and engineering marvels of the ancient world and what makes it all the more dramatic is its mountain backdrop of staggering immensity. The Spaniards never found it; the Incas left no records of it, and so Machu Picchu remained a great enigma, a city lost for centuries in the jungle until it was rediscovered in 1911 by the American historian Hiram Bingham.  Having been trialled in 2017, new regulations for visiting Machu Picchu will be fully enforced for 2018; of the three possible visiting slots, Exodus will purchase the morning slot from 06:00 until 12:00 (unless unavailable), you will be limited to a maximum of four hours within the site and must be accompanied by a guide. There will also be three set routes to follow around Machu Picchu; Exodus selects the most comprehensive route.  We catch an afternoon train back to Ollantaytambo (1hr 30 mins) and continue by private bus to Cuzco (2hrs 30 mins). *Hotel Warari / Hotel Koyllur (or similar)** *

  • 12

    Drive across altiplano to Puno (3800m), on the shores of Lake Titicaca.

    Today we take a bus ride across the altiplano, the high plains separating the Andes from the jungles. Although it is quite a long drive (10 hours including stops), the views are spectacular. There are scheduled stops along the route to visit some of the most interesting sites which helps break up the day and we get a feel for the immensity of the Andean landscapes. A packed lunch is included today.  We arrive in the evening in Puno, a high, chilly town on the shores of Lake Titicaca. *Casona Plaza Hotel (or similar)** *

  • 13

    Boat to Amantani Island for village homestay.

    We explore Lake Titicaca, visiting the lesser-known Titinos communities who live on islands of floating reeds and produce some fine textiles. Though the altitude here (3850m) is tiring, the air is very clear and the lakeside views can be magnificent, with the snow-capped peaks of the Andes towering in the background. We spend the night on Amantani Island where we experience a homestay with the local villagers - this really allows us to see what life is like for the people in an isolated island community. *Titicaca Homestay (basic accommodation)*

  • 14

    End Lima.

    The trip ends after breakfast today. Those on group flights will be transferred to the airport in the morning for the overnight flight to London. **

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